Everyone knows about the White House, but where do the rest of the world’s leaders live?

Unsurprisingly, the world’s most powerful people live in luxurious homes befitting their positions. These palaces and abodes are equipped with everything from helipads to priceless works of art.

From the Imperial Palace in Tokyo, where Japan’s Emperor Akihito lives, to Paris’ Élysée Palace, where French President François Hollande resides, here are the lavish residences of 12 world leaders.

Palácio da Alvorada in Brasília, Brazil, has housed every Brazilian president since 1956. The modernist digs feature a reflecting pool and sculptures by Brazilian artist Alfredo Ceschiatti.

Palácio da Alvorada in Brasília, Brazil, has housed every Brazilian president since 1956. The modernist digs feature a reflecting pool and sculptures by Brazilian artist Alfredo Ceschiatti.
Wikimedia Commons/Palácio do Planalto

The minimalist home has private suites, a giant living room, and a basement that houses an auditorium, game room, warehouse, and kitchen.

The minimalist home has private suites, a giant living room, and a basement that houses an auditorium, game room, warehouse, and kitchen.
Wikimedia Commons/Secretaria de Imprensa e Porta-Voz da Presidência da República

Near the famous Champs-Élysées in Paris, France, the Élysée Palace (or Palais de l’Élysée) has been the official residence of the President of the French Republic since the 1840s. French president François Hollande has lived here since 2012.

Near the famous Champs-Élysées in Paris, France, the Élysée Palace (or Palais de l’Élysée) has been the official residence of the President of the French Republic since the 1840s. French president François Hollande has lived here since 2012.
Shutterstock/Frederic Legrand – COMEO

The palace, which was built in 1722, is dripping in gold. The best example of its lavish interiors is the Salle des Fêtes (or “Hall of Festivities”), where every French president is inaugurated. It is also the official room for conferences and banquets.

The palace, which was built in 1722, is dripping in gold. The best example of its lavish interiors is the Salle des Fêtes (or "Hall of Festivities"), where every French president is inaugurated. It is also the official room for conferences and banquets.
Shutterstock/Frederic Legrand – COMEO

The president’s office is known as the Salon Doré (or “golden room”), aptly named for the abundance of gold it features on its walls, doors, tables, and even chairs.

The president's office is known as the Salon Doré (or "golden room"), aptly named for the abundance of gold it features on its walls, doors, tables, and even chairs.
Wikimedia Commons/Leurent.t

The Imperial Palace sits in the middle of Tokyo, but inside of a vast park surrounded by a moat and thick stone walls. It’s home to Japan’s Emperor Akihito and his family.

The Imperial Palace sits in the middle of Tokyo, but inside of a vast park surrounded by a moat and thick stone walls. It's home to Japan's Emperor Akihito and his family.
Shutterstock/Golovlev Igor

The White House, in Washington, DC, is probably the world’s most famous presidential abode, and the Oval Office, the president’s formal workspace, probably its most famous room. This is where President Donald Trump confers with diplomats, staff, dignitaries, and heads of state.

The White House, in Washington, DC, is probably the world's most famous presidential abode, and the Oval Office, the president’s formal workspace, probably its most famous room. This is where President Donald Trump confers with diplomats, staff, dignitaries, and heads of state.
AP Images

The White House features two dining rooms, one for the presidential family and one for the elaborate dinners held for world leaders.

The White House features two dining rooms, one for the presidential family and one for the elaborate dinners held for world leaders.
Reuters/Joshua Roberts

The Moscow Kremlin, meaning “fortress inside a city,” was built between the 14th and 17th centuries. It houses the official residence of Russia’s presidents.

The Moscow Kremlin, meaning "fortress inside a city," was built between the 14th and 17th centuries. It houses the official residence of Russia's presidents.
Shutterstock/Kudla

The Senate Building, inside the Kremlin complex, is President Vladimir Putin’s official residence.

The Senate Building, inside the Kremlin complex, is President Vladimir Putin's official residence.
Shutterstock/Alexeyart

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